Banishing Truth
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Banishing Truth

“The editor urged me to do nothing,” he writes. “It would be my word versus that of all the cops involved, and all would accuse me of lying. The message was clear: I did not have a story. But of course I did.” He describes himself as “full of despair at my weakness and the weakness of a profession that dealt so easily with compromise and self-censorship.” Hersh, the greatest investigative reporter of his generation, uncovered the U.S. military’s chemical weapons program, which used thousands of soldiers and volunteers, including pacifists from the Seventh-day Adventist Church, as unwitting human guinea pigs to measure the impact of biological agents including tularemia, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever and the plague. He broke the story of the My Lai massacre. He exposed Henry Kissinger’s wiretapping of his closest aides at the National Security Council (NSC) and journalists, the CIA’s funding of violent extremist groups to overthrow the Chilean President Salvador Allende, the CIA’s spying on domestic dissidents within the United States, the sadistic torture practices at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq by American soldiers and contractors and the lies told by the Obama administration about the raid that killed Osama bin Laden. Yet he begins his memoir by the candid admission, familiar to any reporter, that there are crimes and events committed by the powerful you never write about, at least if you want to keep your job. One of his laments in the book is his decision not to follow up on a report he received that disgraced President Richard Nixon had hit his wife, Pat, and she had ended up in an emergency room in California. Reporters embedded with military units in Iraq and Afghanistan routinely witness atrocities and often war crimes committed by the U.S. military, yet they know that access is dependent on keeping quiet. This collusion between the press and the powerful is a fundamental feature of journalism, one that even someone as courageous as Hersh, at least a few times, was forced to accept. And yet, there comes a time when reporters, at least the good ones, decide to sacrifice their careers to tell the truth. Hersh, relentlessly chronicling the crimes of the late empire, including the widespread use of torture, indiscriminate military strikes on civilian targets and targeted assassinations, has for this reason been virtually blacklisted in the American media. And the loss of his voice—he used to work for The New York Times and later The New Yorker—is evidence that the press, always flawed, has now been neutered by corporate power. Hersh’s memoir is as much about his remarkable career as it is about the death of investigative journalism and the transformation of news into a national reality television show that subsists on gossip, invective, officially approved narratives and leaks and entertainment. Investigative journalism depends not only on reporters such as Hersh, but as importantly on men and women inside the systems of power who have the moral courage to expose lies and make public crimes. Writing off any institution, no matter how nefarious the activity, as filled with the irredeemable is a mistake. “There are many officers, including generals and admirals, who understood that the oath of office they took was a commitment to uphold and defend the Constitution and not the President, or an immediate superior,” he writes. “They deserve my respect and got it. Want to be a good military reporter? Find those officers.” One of the heroes in Hersh’s book is Ron Ridenhour, who served in a combat unit in Vietnam and who initiated the army’s investigation into the My Lai massacre and generously helped Hersh track down eyewitnesses and participants. The government’s wholesale surveillance, however, has crippled the ability of those with a conscience, such as Chelsea Manning or Edward Snowden, to expose the crimes of state and remain undetected. The Obama administration charged eight people under the Espionage Act of leaking to the media—Thomas Drake, Shamai Leibowitz, Stephen Kim, Chelsea Manning, Donald Sachtleben, Jeffrey Sterling, John Kiriakou and Edward Snowden—effectively ending the vital connection between investigative reporters and sources inside the government. This government persecution has, by default, left the exposure of government lies, fraud and crimes to hackers. And this is the reason hackers, and those who publish their material such as Julian Assange at WikiLeaks, are relentlessly persecuted. The goal of the corporate state is to hermetically seal their activities, especially those that violate the law, from outside oversight or observation. And this goal is very far advanced. Hersh notes throughout his memoir that, like all good reporters, he constantly battled his editors and fellow reporters as much as he did the government or corporations. There is a species of reporter you can see on most cable news programs and on the floor of the newsrooms at papers such as The New York Times who make their living as courtiers to the powerful. They will, at times, critique the excesses of power but never the virtues of the systems of power, including corporate capitalism or the motivations of the ruling elites. They detest reporters, like Hersh, whose reporting exposes their collusion. The Bertrand Russell War Crimes Tribunal was held in 1967 in Europe during the Vietnam War. It included the testimony of three American soldiers who spoke of watching soldiers and Marines routinely pump indiscriminate rounds of ammunition into villages with no regard for civilian casualties. Most of the American press dismissed the findings of the tribunal.  The Times foreign affairs columnist, C.L. Sulzberger, launched a venomous attack against the Noble Prize-winning philosopher and mathematician, who was then 94 years old. Sulzberger, a member of the family that owned the paper, wrote that Russell had “outlived his own conscious idea and become clay in unscrupulous hands.” The tribunal, Sulzberger went on, “cannot fairly be laid at the door of the wasted peer whose bodily endurance outpaced his brain.” Hersh, however, tipped off by the testimony at the tribunal, eventually uncovered the My Lai massacre. But no publication would touch it. Magazines such as Life and Look turned down the story. “I was devastated, and frightened by the extent of self-censorship I was encountering in my profession,” Hersh writes. He finally published the story with the obscure, anti-war Dispatch News Service. Major publications, including The New York Times, along with Newsweek and Time, ignored the report. Hersh kept digging. More lurid facts about the massacre came to light.  It became too big to dismiss, as hard as the mainstream media initially tried, and Hersh was awarded the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting. The only officer convicted of the war crime, which left 106 men, women and children dead, was Lt. William Calley, who spent three months and 13 days in prison. Papers like the New York Times pride themselves on their special access to the powerful, even if that access turns them into a public relations arm of the elites. This desire for access—which news organizations feel gives them prestige and an inside seat, although the information they are fed is usually lies or half-truths—pits conscientious reporters like Hersh against most editors and reporters in the newsroom. Hersh, who at the time was working for the Times, describes sitting across from another reporter, Bernard Gwertzman, who was covering Henry Kissinger and the NSC. “There was a near-daily ritual involving Bernie that stunned me,” Hersh writes. “On far too many afternoons around 5:00, Max Frankel’s secretary would approach Bernie and tell him that Max [the Times’ bureau chief in Washington] was at that moment on the phone with ‘Henry’ and the call would soon he switched to him. Sure enough, in a few moments Bernie would avidly begin scratching notes as he listened to Kissinger—he listened far more than he talked—and the result was a foreign policy story that invariably led the paper the next morning, with quotes from an unnamed senior government official. After a week or two of observing the process, I asked the always affable and straightforward Bernie if he ever checked what Henry was telling him with Bill Rogers, the secretary of state, or Mel Laird at the Pentagon. “Oh no,’ he said. ‘If I did that, Henry wouldn’t speak to us.’” The Washington Post broke the Watergate story, in which operatives for the Nixon White House in June 1972 broke into the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate office complex in Washington while Hersh was at the Times. Kissinger’s assurances—Hersh writes that Kissinger “lied the way most people breathed”—that it was not an event of consequence saw the top editors at The New York Times initially ignore it. The paper, however, finally embarrassed by the revelations in The Washington Post, threw Hersh onto the story, although the paper’s executive editor, Abe Rosenthal, called Hersh with a mixture of affection and wariness “my little commie.” Hersh left the paper after a massive expose he and Jeff Gerth wrote about the corporation Gulf and Western, which carried out fraud, abuse, tax avoidance and had connections with the mob, was rewritten by cautious and timid editors. Charles Bluhdorn, the CEO of Gulf and Western, socialized with the publisher Arthur “Punch” Sulzberger. Bluhdorn used his connections at the paper to discredit Hersh and Gerth, as well as bombard the paper with accusatory letters and menacing phone calls. When Hersh filed his 15,000-word expose, the business editor, John Lee, and “his ass-kissing coterie of moronic editors,” perhaps fearful of being sued, neutered it. It was one thing, Hersh found, to go up against a public institution. It was something else to take on a private institution. He would never again work regularly for a newspaper. “The experience was frustrating and enervating,” he writes. “Writing about corporate America had sapped my energy, disappointed the editors, and unnerved me. There would be no check on corporate America, I feared: Greed had won out. The ugly fight with Gulf and Western had rattled the publisher and the editors to the point that the editors who ran the business pages had been allowed to vitiate and undercut the good work Jeff and I had done. … The courage the Times had shown in confronting the wrath of a president and an attorney general in the crisis over the Pentagon Papers in 1971 was nowhere to be seen when confronted by a gaggle of corporate con men. …” His reporting, however, continued to relentlessly expose the falsifications in official narratives. The Navy intelligence official, Jonathan Pollard, for example, had been caught spying for Israel in 1985 and given a life sentence. Hersh found that Pollard primarily stole documents on how the United States spied on the Soviet Union. The Israeli government, Hersh suspected, “was trading Pollard’s information to Moscow in exchange for the emigration of Soviet Jews with skills and expertise needed by Israel.” Pollard was released, after heavy Israeli pressure, in 2015 and now lives in Israel. The later part of Hersh’s career is the most distressing. He was writing for The New Yorker when Barack Obama was elected president. David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, socialized with Obama and was apparently wary of offending the president. When Hersh exposed the fictitious narrative spun out by the Obama administration about the killing of Bin Laden, the magazine killed the story, running instead a report about the raid, provided by the administration, from the point of view of one of the SEALs who was on the mission. Hersh resigned. He published the account of the raid in the London Review of Books, the beginning of his current exile to foreign publications. When we most urgently need Hersh and good investigative reporters like him, they have largely disappeared. A democracy, at best, tolerates them. A failed democracy, like ours, banishes them, and when it does, it kills its press.

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Islamic Channels are Fading out | Save Them

Islamic Channels are Fading out | Save Them

Islamic Channels are Fading out | Save ThemDonate here: Gofundme: https://www.gofundme.com/rationalbeliever Paypal: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=EN79XRUF35QWL **************************************************************************************************************************************** As'salamu Alaikum Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakatuh, Dear viewers! As some of you are aware, it’s a couple of months that YouTube has updated its policies by setting the algorithms so that it targets Islamic content and channels. They removed so many Islamic channels from their partner program while almost none of those channels violated any of their policies. With this they try to fade out the Islamic Dawah. Same thing happened to our channel too… It is the third time that our channel is being targeted by YouTube. First they have banned a video worldwide for couple of hours, then they deleted a video with the claim that it violated their terms and conditions while it wasn’t the case... and recently they have demonetized our channel (the only source that could cover a part of our production costs) again by claiming that our content is violating their terms and conditions while in reality we have never promote violence, or produce inappropriate content. It seems like they want to demotivate us so that we stop producing Islamic contents. But by the will of Allah (swt) that will never happen! Indeed production of a professional content needs huge costs and time. A lot of efforts (e.g. providing topics, doing research, providing footage, making narration, recording, graphics, editing & etc...) goes into making only one video. And we alone are not capable of covering the whole costs since we have no more financial source. Therefore we ask you to join and take part in our dawah mission and support our channel in order to continue with even more amazing contents and to help us educate people around the world about the beautiful religion (ISLAM) and make them come closer to Allah (swt). Currently we are unable to create any patreon page due to some problems. But you can donate to the below gofundme and paypal links: For those brothers/sisters who have problem with the donation campaigns for Islamic channels: Just know that Allah is enough for them, it’s about your responsibility for your religion. They didn’t make these channels to make money out of them, for sure if they were looking for money, they would choose some other ways which would make way more money for them. But they chose to serve for their religion. They all try their best and have their own way of presenting the message of Islam… they face huge problems while making those contents which help you and your children. Be with them Support them to spread the truth And be the cause for guidance of masses In Sha Allah In sha Allah your donation will be counted as (Sadaqah Jaariyah) and will get continues rewards since these contents will reach to millions of viewers by the passage of time. If you can't support us financially, please make Dua for us. Jazzak Allahu Khairan, Rational Believer
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Prophet Muhammad (Saw) Stories | Old Woman And The Prophet Muhammad (Saw) | Quran Stories For Kids

Prophet Muhammad (Saw) Stories | Old Woman And The Prophet Muhammad (Saw) | Quran Stories For Kids

Prophet Muhammad (Saw) Stories | Old Woman And The Prophet Muhammad (Saw) | Quran Stories For KidsAssalamu Alaikum ! A long time ago, there lived an old woman who was carrying a heavy load along the road in the desert. It was a bit difficult for her, but she was managing as best as she could. Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) helped her and took the luggage from the woman and carried it for her. Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) asked the woman that where she was going and why? She said that I am leaving this town as I have heard that a magician named Muhammad is in town. Then what happened ? Will Prophet (SAW) help the old lady? Watch the full episode and learn more!!! We are bringing to you, for the very first time, the Stories of the Prophet (pbuh). The stories are structured to teach your little ones about the life and achievements of Prophet in an easy to understand format. Our videos are ideal for 6-12 year old children, and the adults too can enjoy our videos. Our videos are ideal for 4-12 year old children, and the adults too can enjoy our videos. Each of our videos presents the stories of Prophets from different times. Every video highlights the work of a Prophet, and how He preached the message of Allah (swt). The length of each segment, and the easy to understand narrative makes our videos an ideal teaching resource for parents and teachers. Please support us to keep making more videos! Subscribe our channel for latest updates : https://goo.gl/MgzqIw Download ► https://bamazoo.com/Prophetstories Watch our Prophet Stories : 1. Prophet Adam(as): https://goo.gl/qEcc9c 2. Prophet Nuh (Noah) (as): https://goo.gl/g28ENa 3. Prophet Hud (as): https://goo.gl/CxTZz4 4. Prophet Salih (Saleh)(as): https://goo.gl/jbiRQL 5. Prophet Ibrahim (as): https://goo.gl/SCVmrm 6. Prophet Isma'il (Ishmael): https://goo.gl/0b89zs 7. Prophet Ishaq (Isaac) &Prophet Yaqub (as) : https://goo.gl/InP2fB 8. Prophet Lut (Lot) (as): https://goo.gl/Mwiqvb 9. Prophet Yaqub (AS): https://goo.gl/mVEDh4 10. Prophet Shuaib (as) : https://goo.gl/t4hWCh 11. Prophet Yusuf(as): https://goo.gl/ydO3eQ 12. Prophet Ayyub (as) : https://goo.gl/ot5uyu 13. Prophet Yunus (Jonah) (as): https://goo.gl/IqGLeq 14. Prophet Musa (AS) : https://goo.gl/B4PYRg 15.Prophet Yusha AS & Prophet Hizqeel (AS) : https://goo.gl/zWzmVm 16.Prophet Shammil (AS) : https://goo.gl/4v3Q6d 17. Prophet Dawud (AS) Story Part - 1 : https://goo.gl/eBLXpU 18. Prophet Dawud (AS) Story Part-2 : https://goo.gl/2ziQg8 19. Prophet Sulaiman (AS) : https://goo.gl/yKjthN 20. Prophet Isaiah (AS) : https://goo.gl/eoDMHn 21. Prophet UZAIR(AS) : https://goo.gl/ptwfqR 22. Prophet Zakariyah (AS) : https://youtu.be/70qnWsQv5DM 23. Prophet Yahya (AS) Story : https://youtu.be/rGbzcz7tnz0 24. Prophet Isa (AS) Story Part - 1 : https://youtu.be/J-fOJKnU3o8 25. Prophet Isa (AS) Story Part - 2 : https://youtu.be/qE-1TxjIRN4 26. Prophet Isa (AS) Story Part - 3 : https://youtu.be/Zf-YX6Lwn0w 27. Prophet Muhammad(saw)Part1: https://youtu.be/WEEORXFj-lo 28. Prophet Muhammad (saw) Part2 : https://youtu.be/LO3WUk1b7fk 29. Prophet Muhammad (saw) Part3 : https://goo.gl/mtzZ8Z 30. Prophet Muhammad (saw) Part4 : https://goo.gl/iA1uED 31. Abbad Ibn Bashir (RA) : https://goo.gl/q3FDkQ 32. Prophet Ibrahim (AS) : https://goo.gl/ru1Xgd 33. Abdullah Ibn Masood (RA) Part 1: https://goo.gl/ZVmmH7 33. Abdullah Ibn Masood (RA) Part 2: https://goo.gl/BVNEjs 34. Abdullah Ibn Umm Maktum (RA) : https://goo.gl/Uy4Qti 35. Abu Darda (RA) : https://goo.gl/oXuqio 36. Abu Ubaidah ibn al-Jarrah (RA) : https://goo.gl/Psd9Uw 37. Noaman Ibn Muqqarin (RA) : https://goo.gl/SyNwq1 38. Syed Ibn Aamir Al Jumahi (RA) : https://goo.gl/W8PWGJ 39. Abuzar Al Gaffari (RA) : https://goo.gl/CUnr58 40. Salman Al Farisi (RA) part 1 : https://goo.gl/e88h72 41. Salman Al Farisi (RA) Part 2 : https://goo.gl/fbc6vm 42. Hazrat Ammar Ibn Yasir (RA) Part 1 : https://goo.gl/uuCzTJ 43. Hazrat Ammar Ibn Yasir (RA) Part 2 : https
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